Sunday, July 21, 2013

Esperanto

Welcome again to my new post. This time the topic will be Esperanto: a hobby of mine, and a cause under which many people rally.

Esperanto was created by L. L. Zamenoff, a Polish Jewish from Byalistok, in the victorian era.


The fact that he was a Polish Jewish man in Byalistok was really important in this subject, since Byalistok was at that time occupied and controlled by the russians, but still full of poles, jewish people, and some Germans. All of these groups kinda hated each other, and usually had conflicts, which led to a tense environment for everyone, where Zamenhoff spent his childhood and youth.
As the years went by, Zamenhoff came up with an idea: maybe if all those people spoke the same language, instead of speaking Russian, Yiddish, German and Polish, they would have something in common, and thus they would not hate each other!
So, Zamenhoff invented a language which was neutral, since it didn't belong to any nation, by mixing some Latin, English, Germanic, and a little Japanese, as he used the Slavic sounds and writing system. That way he created a language which was not only universal, but also artificial, and thus it was regular in all its aspects: Esperanto has a set of rules, to which it has no exceptions, and once you learn them you can learn the language easily. The same happens with pronunciation: each letter has only one possible sound, and each sound only one possible writing (unlike english, though you may have thought different).
The language currently has 2-3 million speakers worldwide, and it's a gemstone if you like learning linguistics related things, or just love learning many different languages, since it acts as the perfect intermediary between them. They say learning Esperanto saves you a lot of time when learning other languages, and I can testify to that, since it's helped me a lot with croatian (both because of its phonetic system, and because of its relative pronouns system)

If you're interested on learning Esperanto, you can check out my tutorial, or just take a course in www.lernu.net

Bye, and I hope you've liked the post. If you have any suggestions or questions, anything you want to say, or something you want ME to say, comment this post!

2 comments:

  1. This is interesting and unique. I went through tutorial blog too.. It clearly shows that it is artificial after you. But if you dont mention that it is artificial nobody could feel that. But as you wrote about creating a new language system, I blogged about Extinction of Languages

    ramchamade.blogspot.com/2013/08/languages-on-verge-of-extinction.html

    Sometimes it is very interesting to see new language systems but it is very sad to think about Extinction of language

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In the esperanto community, there's a faction who devote themselves to learning almost extinct languages for preservation.

      Delete

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